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Enjoying the powerless features of Democracy

Enjoying the powerless features of Democracy

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Not really all that amazing but it does make one want to say something facile like “amazing” .

Plutocracy is alive and thriving while the great mass of citizens play at republican democracy, enjoying all the best features–like voting, a good amount of freedom of speech, a certain amount of free assembly–while having none of the power that the features imply.

Unlike many, I do not say that the…

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Princeton University - ‘MOOC World’: Experts clash over differing visions of education technology

See on Scoop.it - Pahndeepah Perceptions


Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

Very much worth the read for all who are concerned about their own future after leaving the network of Higher Instruction or for those who live within the Network as facilitators (both instructional and administrative staff. 

"…William Lawton, director of the Observatory on Borderless Higher Education in London, said MOOCs and online learning do not threaten the core values of higher education. Rather, the threats are commercial imperatives forcing universities to run as businesses and equating education goals with those of government.

"The real revolution will come when there are digital platforms everywhere that are providing hundreds and thousands of courses that are designed specifically for the needs in those places," Lawton said, and when employers and society in those countries recognize and accept such credits as valid.

Lawton predicted that rather than going to extremes, most institutions will combine traditional and online practices. “The future is basically blended,” he said.

Bruno Latour, scientific director at the Sciences Po Médialab in Paris and who has taught online, likened the expansion of digital education to a brain expanding its capacity upon its development of a nervous system.

"The title of my MOOC and the motto of my MOOC on scientific humanity is taken from Latin," he said. "Not ‘cogito ergo sum’ but ‘cogitamus ergo civitas sumus.’ We think, thus we form a collective together. And that, I think, is a good motto for the university of the future."…"


See on princeton.edu

Papyrus Referring to Jesus’ Wife Is More Likely Ancient Than Fake, Scientists Say

See on Scoop.it - Pahndeepah Perceptions

The test results do not prove that Jesus had a wife, only that the fragment of papyrus with the phrase, “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife,’” is most likely not a forgery.

Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

"…Dr. King presented the fragment with fanfare at a conference in Rome in September 2012, but wasbesieged by criticism because the content was controversial, the lettering was suspiciously splotchy, the grammar was poor, its provenance was uncertain, its owner insisted on anonymity and its ink had not been tested.

An editorial in the Vatican’s newspaper also declared it a fake. New Testament scholars claimed the text referred to the “bride of Christ,” which is the church — an interpretation Dr. King said was entirely possible…”


See on nytimes.com

Kids With Rare Disease May Hold Secret to Stopping Viruses - NBC News

See on Scoop.it - Pahndeepah Perceptions

A brother and sister with an extremely rare genetic condition have a stunning ability to fight off viruses — an ability that could lead to a new family of an…

Keith Wayne Brown's insight:

… the same mutation that’s caused their health troubles also manages to cripple viruses, preventing them from setting up an infection. The children are practically immune to many viral infections…


…The mutation prevents the children’s bodies from finishing a very basic biological function called glycosylation, which is the process of attaching sugars to proteins. “It affects almost every organ, every function of the body,” Rosenzweig said.

It also blocks viruses, because viruses are not complete organisms. They can’t do anything without first hijacking a cell…



See on nbcnews.com

Carbon Dioxide Levels Climb Into Uncharted Territory for Humans - Highest since 800,000 Years

See on Scoop.it - Pahndeepah Perceptions

The amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere has exceeded 402 parts per million (ppm) during the past two days of observations, which is higher than at any time in at least the past 800,000 years, according to readings from monitoring equipment on a mountaintop in Hawaii. Carbon dioxide, or CO2, is the most important long-lived greenhouse gas responsible for manmade global warming, and it is building up in the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas.

Once emitted, a single molecule of carbon dioxide can remain aloft for hundreds of years, which means that the effects of today’s industrial activities will be felt for the next several centuries, if not thousands of years. Carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, such as methane, warm the planet by absorbing and redirecting outgoing solar radiation that would otherwise escape back into space.

In 2013, atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide briefly hit 400 ppm for the first time in mid-May, but this year that symbolic threshold has been crossed even earlier. This means it is more likely that the annual peak, which typically occurs in mid-to-late May, will climb further above 400 ppm for the first time.

Although crossing above 400 ppm is largely a symbolic milestone, scientific research indicates that the higher that carbon dioxide concentrations get, the more global temperatures will increase, resulting in a wide range of damaging effects. These impacts will range from global sea level rise to a heightened risk of heat waves, severe droughts and floods, according to a recently released comprehensive assessment of climate science produced by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Modern carbon dioxide monitoring began in 1958 on the peak of Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano, which is more than two miles high. At that time, carbon dioxide concentrations were at just 313 ppm. They have risen rapidly and steadily since then, both at Mauna Loa and at other observatories around the world. The chart documenting this rise is perhaps the most iconic in all of climate science, known as the “Keeling Curve” for Charles David Keeling, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography scientist who began and maintained the monitoring program.


According to the Keeling Curve website, carbon dioxide concentrations spiked to 402.20 parts per million on April 7, whereas data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) showed a slightly lower level of 402.11 parts per million on the same day. Both data sets indicate that daily carbon dioxide measurements have been at or above 400 ppm since March 29, and the graph appears on course to stay above 400 ppm throughout the rest of the month and into the next.


See on mashable.com

Finding Life After Academia — and Not Feeling Bad About It - NYTimes.com

Finding Life After Academia — and Not Feeling Bad About It – NYTimes.com

According to a 2011 National Science Foundation survey, 35 percent of doctorate recipients — and 43 percent of those in the humanities — had no commitment for employment at the time of completion. Fewer than half of Ph.D.’s are expected to land tenure-track jobs. And many voluntarily choose another path because they want higher pay or more direct engagement with the world than monographs and…

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Finding Life After Academia — and Not Feeling Bad About It - NYTimes.com

Finding Life After Academia — and Not Feeling Bad About It – NYTimes.com

According to a 2011 National Science Foundation survey, 35 percent of doctorate recipients — and 43 percent of those in the humanities — had no commitment for employment at the time of completion. Fewer than half of Ph.D.’s are expected to land tenure-track jobs. And many voluntarily choose another path because they want higher pay or more direct engagement with the world than monographs and…

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